27″ iMac Pricing Guide

Yeah yeah, here is the 27″ iMac pricing guide. This is in addition to the 21.5″ Guide, more information given on that one.
I’ve had a few of these before and they are nice, luckily I’ve yet to come across a bad GPU model. There’s a lot of tech garble on this, so skip down to ‘Pricing Guide’ if you’re just interested in iMac pricing only.

Common Upgrade Pains on most iMacs:

  • Installing a bigger HDD or SSD can make the fan run at 100% – MacFan Control to ‘fix it’
  • RAM upgrading is a pain – some 2009 – 2012 iMacs are more picky & don’t boot from RAM
  • CPU upgrading is a gamble – iMacs won’t just boot, specifically the i7-3770s working but i7-3770 wont for you, but to others… it can work just fine

This page was made in November 2017, so prices should depreciate from 5% to 20%.
There are 2 distinguishable versions so far; the ‘thick’ 2009 to 2011 units with the vent on top & DVD drive, then there is the 2012 & later that don’t have CD drives, thinner, and have the RAM door right below/behind the hinge.
In addition to this, the late 2014 models introduced a 5K display.

Disclaimers:

You’ll get mixed results on upgrading the processors on the 27″ model, not sure about Core 2 Quad/Extreme or i5/i7 on the 21.5″. Also you can supposedly upgrade the GPUs on these machines. But this post will mainly focus upon finding a good deal to buy or one to flip. Another thing on these GPUs is that they use laptop or mobile versions of the graphics card. So my Passmark scores might not be that completely accurate because these were tested on a wide range of machines that has different heatsink designs, voltage input and (most importantly) different dedicated RAM configurations, so just take it as a ballpark.

To make things easier, we are going to start with the common iMac, 21.5″ (A1311 or A1312 model body). These machines are becoming fairly cheap now, and this will most likely be a great gift for anyone who wants to replace their old desktop. I am going to start detailed information upon them all and then do the price comparisons, then the same sequence with the 27″ iMac. All of these iMacs are High Sierra compatible, not so sure if they’ll work on the next OS update, as Apple seemed to kill off the 2009 Mac Pro & even the latest Mac Mini.

Abbrevations… just in case you don’t know them 🙂
DC – Dual Core
QC – Quad Core
CPU – Processor, Central Processor Unit, the computational power (word, calculations)
RAM – Random Access Memory – Higher = more tabs on chrome, layers in photoshop, tracks on music programs
BTO/CTO – Build or Configure to Order
dRAM – Dedicated RAM for Graphics Cards
HDD – Hard Disk Drive
SSD – Solid Disk Drive (fast)
Fusion – These are SSHD drives whch is a HDD with a SSD built into the greenboard. The numbers in parenthesis will be how big the SSD partition is, e.g. 1TB Fusion (128) = means 1TB HDD space, 128GB SSD space.
PM – PassMark Score – Higher the better, note CPU and GPU scores are different from each other.
There are two scores for passmark, the first is the score total for the CPU, and the second is the single core/thread, some applications are limited to single core performance or dual core performance, which quadcores aren’t needed.

How to Identify a 27″ iMac

First off, I’m going to say, its going to be very very hard to tell which iMac it is, if you just have a photo of the front.
All these iMacs look directly identical without any angled shots. From what I understand, the base is slightly thicker on the 2009 to 2011 models, and it got thinner for 2012 and later. Even with that information, I believe it is near impossible to know if its 5K 2014 model or later.

However, MacWorld did notice the later iMacs are less reflective, so if you don’t easily notice the black outline square, it might be a newer model. This is only when the screen is off. Good luck with it turned on.

 

2009 to 2011 27″ iMac

However if you do get to see an angled shot, or a side shot, it is very easy to tell if its ‘thick’ 2009 to 2011 or thinner 2012 and later.
I mean just look at it, the sides are about a inch thick, while the other ones are about 5cm. The right side you will see a slit for a DVD drive and below that, an SD Card slot. In addition to this, 2009 iMacs have that ‘cheese grader’ vent holes like the Aluminum Mac Pro or PowerMac G5. RAM is located on the bottom if the door is missing.

 

2012 to 2015 27″ iMac

Gone is the DVD drive, the SD Card slot is now relocated inconveniently in the back. You’ll notice the sides of the unit are very slim. On the rear you will not see any vent grills or holes of any kind. On the bottom you will see vent slits, but these are for in-taking cool air, the exhaust fan is in the middle of the unit. You won’t see the exhaust fan outlet is obfuscated by the stand, you’ll notice it when seeing on the side. In addition to this, the 27″ iMac has that RAM door cover, the 21.5″ slim models do not, so if someone is advertising a 4K iMac and you are not sure if its a 27″, that RAM door would give it away. The power button looks like it was moved slightly more closer to the center than the previous model, because aesthetics matter more than convenience to Apple! Also the Vesa mount options look like they limit the exhaust.

 

2017 iMacs and later

They look identical to previous Tampered Edge iMacs of 2012, but now they have two USB C ports (ThunderBolt 3) instead of the ThunderBolt 2 that is backwards compatible being a MiniDisplayPort. Highly doubtful if someone doesn’t remember what year iMac they are selling, unless its like, stolen or for some odd reason, the business is fire selling it and the IT team got fired or… someone goofed up real bad. If you can’t see it, ThunderBolt 3 (USB C) looks like a 0 and not a squared D like the previous ThunderBolt 2.

 

And Just because. iMac Pro Hype Train

Obviously the easiest way to distinguish the 2017 iMac Pro thats being released in December, is the Dark Grey exterior is has. In addition to this, they brought in new intake inlets so you can definitely see that and the exhaust fan looks like the machine can actually blow out heat. In addition, they now have 4 USB C (Thunderbolt 3) ports and 10 gig Ethernet. (;

 

 

Installing an Operating System?

First off, knowing all the Startup Keys from Apple will be a big benefit.
If you bought a unit and don’t have the login password (not firmware), then the best thing is to create a new user instead.

  • When starting up, press and hold Command + S
  • A bunch of code will commence, wait until it asks for root
  • type: /sbin/fsck/ -fy
  • Sometimes this takes from 5 seconds to 2 minutes til it prompts
  • type: /sbin/mount/ -uaw
  • It should go quickly to the next prompt
  • type: rm /var/db/.applesetupdone
  • type: reboot
  • Then create a new user like you normally would, I’ve done this on an iMac G3 to Sierra.

If you don’t have a USB preinstalled with Sierra, Yosetmite, El Capitan or High Sierra, then the next best thing is internet recovery.

  • When turning on try Command-R and wait til it prompts to connect to the internet, but don’t wait longer than 3 minutes
  • Try Option-Command-R or Shift-Option-Command-R if the previous didn’t work
  • Apple probably says it best, just be sure to partition the HDD if you’re using a blanked or new HDD/SSD.
  • Wait from 2 to 7 hours for it to install, then do the setup.

I had to use that way on a 27″ iMac because it seemed to not like my USB I installed. I kept on getting errors like “OSX cannot be installed on this system” near late to the process. There might be some other errors you may encounter too, read on.

With installing OSX so many times, I would do a PRAM reset (command option P R) and then boot to the USB.
Just to be safe, make sure to format the HDD again, and I would have to set the clock too.
I always have to do this whenever I get a macbook that has been sitting with a dead battery.
Sometimes this would have to be the case with an iMac or Mac Pro because their time clock battery might be low or off.

  • To reset the time clock you have to go to utilities on the top left corner and click on Command line
  • For this example, the date will be December 25th 2017, & the time will be 10:30PM.
  • So for that I would have to type: date 122518302017
  • Then install like usual

Recommended sellers

Don’t buy from:

  • LegitiMac – Overpriced & Misleading Titles (like OSX-2017 when its a fucking 2009 Macbook w/ High Sierra)
  • Experimac – I made a video about this, overpriced local store
  • iSellMac – Overpriced, sells overpriced broken parts which they obviously pull parts from and leave you with shit they don’t want to fix.
  • iSellMacParts – Their other store selling broken crap only.
  • Sellers with ZERO feedback and have stock photos for their items with limited info or ‘mint condition/brand new’ and super low prices

Recommended & Fair Sellers

  • IT Replay – Good Prices for general IT equipment, they do auctions.
  • MacsRu1e – Good prices, they seem to test these fairly.
  • GreenCitizen – Usually they auction items of all kinds. Made profit fixing up their ‘as is’ units.
  • Quality Macs – A bit pricey on new models or mint condition, based in San Diego, they are detailed in info and battery life too.
  • Tekdeals – Fair prices, a bit pricey on later machines, all BIN so yeah.

Pricing Guide – Done on November 20th 2017

Power Rankings – From Best to Worst

  • Best – The best you can get at the time, usually a CTO option
  • Better – High end model, but might be limited in some way, can be the ‘best one you can get’ but isn’t IMO.
  • Good – You’ll might be likely to feel some constraints if you wish to push it.
  • Mid – Middle of the road, standard model.
  • Fair  – Typically these have a better CPU than the entry model if you spring cash for it.
  • Base – Entry model, for those who need the bare necessities.
  • Edu – Education model, downgraded CPU, RAM and HDD size, but still decent for photoshop.
  • Budget – A base model with slower CPU, cheaper HDD, less RAM, and/or downgraded GPU

Late 2009 – iMac 10,1 – Core 2 Duo & i5 or i7 1st Gen- 4GB RAM 1066MHz

260 sold: 3 ‘New’, 13 refurbs, 180 used, 65 for parts
As Is – $100 to $350
Used – $250 to $420 // $700
Refurbs – $320 to $640
Core i5 – $320 to $480 ~ 66 sold
Core i7 – $340 to $666 ~ 82 sold
16GB   – $400 to $580  ~ 27 sold
32GB   – $550 to $910 ~ 5 sold

Screen – $120 to $240 ~ compatible to 2011
Glass    – $50 to $130  ~ compatible to 2011

  • Base Model – 3.06GHz E7600 w/ 3MB – PM 1997 & 1251 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD, & ATI Radeon HD 4670m w/ 256MB dRAM – PM 465
  • Fair Model –  3.33GHz E8600 w/ 6MB – PM 2412 & 1373 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD, & ATI Radeon HD 4670m w/ 256MB dRAM – PM 465
  • Better Model – 2.66GHz QC i5-750 w/ 8MB – PM 3708 & 1139 Single Thread
  • 1TB HDD & ATI Radeon HD 4850m w/ 512MB dRAM – PM 856
  • Best Model – 2.8GHz QC i7-860 w/ 8MB – PM 5040 & 1228 Single Thread
  • 1TB HDD & ATI Radeon HD 4850m w/ 512MB dRAM – PM 856
  • Only supports SDHC cards
  • These have 4 USB ports, one Firewire 800 port and one mini DisplayPort
  • A lot of these as is machines have GPU issues, and bad or no screens
  • As Is machines, expect some chipped glass
  • I’m weary on parted out iMacs, I am super sure they take out what is tested and working, while selling what is broken… not like buying an as is ThinkPad/Latitude/Elitebook

Mid 2010 – iMac 11,3 – Core i3, i5, & i7 1st Gen – 4GB RAM 1333MHz

225 sold: 1 ‘New’, 7 refurbs, 198 used, 29 for parts
As Is – $140 to $320
Used – $270 to $600 // $900
Refurbs – $540 to $900
2.8 QC i5 – $350 to $635 ~ 35 sold
2.9 QC i7 – $370 to $650 // $860 ~ 81 sold
16GB       – $360 to $800 ~ 30 sold
32GB      – $700 to $800   ~ 2 sold
2TB HDD – $400 to $670 ~ 29 sold
3TB HDD – $685 to $ 730 ~ 2 sold
128 – 512GB SSD – $450 to $800 ~ 20 sold ~ some are fusion HDDs

  • Budget Model – 3.2GHz DC i3-550 w/ 4MB – PM 2836 & 1300 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & ATI Radeon HD 5670m w/ 512MB dRAM – PM 714
  • Good Model – 3.6GHz DC i5-680 w/ 4MB – PM 3508 & 1537 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & ATI Radeon HD 5670m w/ 512MB dRAM – PM 714
  • Mid model – 2.8GHz QC i5-760 w/ 8MB – PM 3899 & 1198 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & ATI Radeon HD 5750m w/ 1GB dRAM – PM 1426
  • Best Model – 2.93GHz QC i7-870 w/ 8MB – PM 5040 & 1228 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & ATI Radeon HD 5750m w/ 1GB dRAM – PM 1426
  • Now with SDXC Card Support
  • These are identical to the Late 2009 i5/i7 models except newer GPU architecture, & faster RAM
  • I am seeing HDD upgraded units, 2TB and 3TB. Some of these could be fusion drives, but I didn’t comb the details

Mid 2011 – iMac 12,2 – Core i5 & i7 2nd Gen – 4GB RAM 1333MHz

500 sold: 1 ‘New’, 70 refurbs, 385 used, 70 for parts
As Is – $200 to $450
Used – $260 to $725 // $1200
Refurbs – $300 to $770 // $1440
3.1 QC i5 – $290 to $650 ~ 110 sold
3.4 QC i7 – $430 to $870 // $1300 ~ 200 sold
16GB      – $390 to $800 ~ 130 sold
32GB      – $500 to $1250 ~ 19 sold
Fusion     – $420 to $700 ~ 5 sold
2TB HDD – $400 to $1000 ~ 30 sold
3TB HDD – $640 to $930 ~ 22 sold

  • Base Model – 2.7GHz QC i5-2500S w/ 6MB – PM 5296 & 1810 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & AMD Radeon HD 6770M w/ 512MB dRAM – PM 1700
  • Fair Model – 3.1GHz QC i5-2400 w/ 6MB – PM 5918 & 1744 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & AMD Radeon HD 6970M w/ 1GB dRAM – PM 2033
  • Better Model – 3.4GHz i7-2600 w/ 8MB – PM 8213 & 1921 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & AMD Radeon HD 6970M w/ 1GB dRAM – PM 2033
  • Improvements are a better webcam, and two ThunderBolt ports which double as Mini DisplayPorts
  • Sadly, these are the last of the easy upgradeable iMacs
  • There are hilarious titles for these iMacs: JACKPOT, TOP NOTCH, PURE POWER

Tampered Edge iMac

Late 2012 – 13,2 iMac – i5 & i7 3rd Gen – 8GB RAM 1600MHz

260 sold: 3 ‘New’, 20 refurbs, 220 used, 20 for parts
As Is – $200 to $505
Used – $400 to $925 // $1300
Refurbs – $500 to $850
3.2 QC i5 – $500 to $900 ~ 38 sold
3.4 QC i7 – $530 to $1000 // $1200 ~ 90 sold
16GB       – $480 to $909 ~ 68 sold
32GB       – $585 to $1295 ~ 39 sold
1TB Fusion – $700 to $1000 ~ 23 sold
3TB Fusion – $800 to $1250 ~ 25 sold

4K Screen – $460 to $550 ~ compatible to 2014
Glass is unavailable to buy separately

  • Base Model – 2.9GHz QC i5-3470S w/ 6MB – PM 6278 & 1858 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD, & nVidia GeForce GTX 660M w/ 512MB dRAM – PM 1417
  • Mid Model – 3.2GHz QC i5-3470 w/ 6MB – PM 6645 & 1912 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD, & nVidia GeForce GTX 675MX w/ 1GB dRAM – PM 2400
  • Better Model – 3.4GHz QC i7-3770 w/ 8MB – PM 9307 & 2068
  • 1TB HDD, & nVidia GeForce GTX 675MX w/ 1GB dRAM – PM 2400
  • In the slimmer iMacs they removed the optical drive, the SD Card slot is now behind the iMac…
  • Oddly Apple went with nVidia graphics, so this year and next year are arguably great for Adobe programs, because nVidia uses CUDA cores and some companies ultilized/forced to use them to give nVidia an edge.
  • They also removed the FireWire port, & separate microphone input, but added 802.11n wifi, & bluetooth 4.0 nao
  • Still 4 USB ports, but now these are USB 3.0 instead of 2.0
  • Instead of upgrading RAM from the bottom, there is now a door in the rear, this isn’t available in the 21.5″ models
  • The glass is fused or glued onto the display, supposedly it can’t be removed or replaced = deal on ‘broken’ iMac

Late 2013 – iMac 14,2 – i5 & i7 4th Gen – 8GB RAM 1600MHz

350 sold: 10 ‘New’, 37 refurbs, 291 used, 21 for parts
As Is – $330 to $600
Used – $415 to $950 // $1460
Refurbs – $560 to $1100
‘New’   – $675 to $1500
3.4 QC i5 – $590 to $840 // $1000 ~ 43 sold
3.5 QC i7 – $625 to $1250 // $1685 ~ 110 sold
16GB       – $460 to $1020 // $1400 ~ 120 sold
32GB       – $710 to $1470 // $1780 ~ 64 sold
1TB Fusion – $770 to $1215 ~ 16 sold
3TB Fusion – $845 to $1300 to $1520 ~ 32 sold
Various SSD – $750 to $1260 // $1500 ~ 28 sold

  • Base Model – 3.2GHz QC i5-4570 w/ 6MB – PM 7080 & 2054 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD, & nVidia GeForce GT 755M w/ 1GB dRAM – PM 1578
  • Better Model – 3.4GHz QC i5-4670 w/ 6MB – PM 7397 & 2152 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD, & nVidia GeForce GTX 775M w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 4186
  • Best Model – 3.5GHz QC i7-4771 w/ 8MB – PM 9867 & 2215 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD, & nVidia GeForce GTX 775M w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 4186
  • Upgrades on this is 802.11ac wifi, otherwise all the same.

Late/Oct 2014 – iMac 15,1 – 5K Retina – i5 & i7 4th Gen – 8GB RAM 1600MHz

180 sold: 3 New, 2 New-ish, 10 refurbs, 167 used
Used – $700 to $1824 // $2020
Refurb – $700 to $1650
Newish – $1400 to $1840
New     – $1100 to $1545
16GB   – $840 to $1800 ~ 32 sold
32GB   – $1050 to $1850 // $2100 ~ 80 sold
4GHz i7 – $1360 to $1900 // $2500 ~ 85 sold
512 SSD – $1375 to $1840 ~ 18 sold
3TB Fusion – $1550 to $1850 // $2140

5K Display – $300 to $500 ~ Exact Panel is LM270QQ1-SDA2

  • Mid Model – 3.5GHz QC i5-4690 w/ 6MB – PM 7611 & 2212 Single thread
  • 1TB Fusion (128GB), & AMD Radeon R9 M290X w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 4248
  • Better Model – 4GHz QC i7-4790K w/ 8MB – PM 11191 & 2530 Single thread
  • 1TB Fusion (128GB), & AMD Radeon R9 M290X w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 4248
  • From now on, these iMacs are using AMD graphics, so if you use Final Cut Pro X, this is ‘recommended’ by Apple, but in hindsight the slightly better CPU options here also help too.
  • Please don’t buy an iMac for cryptocoin mining, these use laptop GPUs, and if you do, get a fan or something to cool the rear.
  • These units now have a new 5K display, 5120 x 2880 pixels
  • Apple upgraded Thunderbolt to ThunderBolt 2 ports

Mid 2015 – iMac 15,1 – 5K Retina – i5 – 8GB RAM 1600MHz

17 sold: 1 New, 2 refurbs, 11 used, 3 for parts
As Is – $450 to $520
Used – $1120 to $1300
Refurb – $1300
New – $1250

  • Budget Model – 3.3GHz QC i5-4590 w/ 6MB – PM 7247 & 2113 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD & AMD Radeon R9 M290 w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 3700???
  • There’s no benchmarks on this Radeon card, but it is known to be slower than the M290X
  • Compared to the previous 2015 i5 model, this was $500 cheaper at launch & with a regular HDD
  • I don’t know why Apple never had a Haswell CPU system, maybe it had something to do with that deflecting sales from their aging & neglected Mac Pro trash can.
  • Not sure why they brought this out, this isn’t an Education model and the newer iMac came out soon after. QQ no Haslel processor
  • Not too many of these sold… must of been unpopular due to people waiting for the newer systems.

Late 2015 – iMac 17,1 – 5K Retina (DCI-P3) – i5 & i7 6th Gen – 8GB DDR3L RAM 1866MHz

165 Sold: 10 New, 12 New-ish, 11 Refurbs, 132 Used, 1 for parts
As Is – $510
Used – $920 to $1950 // $3300
Refurb – $1200 to $2300
Newish – $1200 to $2000
New     – $1500 to $2400
16GB     – $1160 to $2000 ~ 17 sold
32GB     – $1550 to $2330 ~ 38 sold
4GHz i7 – $1630 to $2530 ~ 46 sold
512GB SSD – $1750 to $2425 ~ 11 sold
3TB Fusion – $1900 to $2150

5K Screen – $390 – $550 ~ Exact Panel for DCI-P3 is LM270QQ1-SDB1

  • Base Model – 3.2GHz QC i5-6500 w/ 6MB – PM 7229 & 1948 Single thread
  • 1TB HDD or 1TB Fusion (24GB) with two GPU options
  • AMD Radeon R9 M380 w/ 2GB dRAM – PM3048  or R9 M390  w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 4500?
  • Mid Model – 3.3GHz QC i5-6600 w/ 6MB – PM 7743 & 2095 Single thread
  • 2TB Fusion (128GB), & AMD Radeon R9 M395 w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 5210
  • Better Model – 4.0GHz QC i7-6700K w/ 8MB – PM 11110 & 2351 Single thread
  • 1TB Fusion (24GB) or 2TB Fusion (128GB), with two GPU options
  • AMD Radeon R9 M390  w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 4500? or R9 M395 w/ 2GB dRAM – PM 5210
  • The 5K display is not equal to others, it has a wider color gamut, so if you’re a photographer on a budget, try to get one of these.
  • I don’t know if the previous 5K panel is a drop in or swapable… find out for yourself and let me know! XD

Mid 2017 – iMac 18,3 – 5K Retina (Brighter DCI-P3) – i5 & i7 7th Gen – 8GB DDR4 2400MHz

130 sold: 70 New, 30 New-ish, 1 Refurb, 31 Used
Used – $1300 to $2250 // 3380
‘New’ – $1570 to $2740 // $4000
New  – $1700 to $3100 // $3600
32GB – $2200 to $2800+ ~ 21 sold
4.2 i7 – $2600 to $4200 ~ 42 sold
3TB Fusion – $3000 to $4600 ~ 7 Sold

5K Bright Screen – $700??? Unavailable in markets, send it in to Apple 🙁

  • Base Model – 3.4GHz QC i5-7500 w/ 6MB – PM 8103 & 2120 Single thread
  • 1TB Fusion (32GB), & Radeon Pro 570 w/ 4GB dRAM – PM 4200?
  • Fair Model – 3.5GHz QC i5-7600 w/ 6MB – PM 8892 & 2310 Single thread
  • 1TB Fusion (32GB), & Radeon Pro 575 w/ 4GB dRAM – PM 5600?
  • Mid Model – 3.6GHz QC i5-7600K w/ 6MB – PM 9233 & 2396 Single thread
  • 2TB Fusion (128GB), & Radeon Pro 580 w/ 8GB dRAM – PM 7000?
  • Best? Model – 4.2GHz QC i7-7700K w/ 8MB – PM 12104 & 2581 Single thread
  • 1TB Fusion (32GB), or 2TB Fusion (128GB), & two GPU options
  • AMD Radeon Pro 575 w/ 4GB dRAM – PM 5600? or Pro 580 w/ 8GB dRAM – PM 7000?
  • For the ports, replaced ThunderBolt 2 with ThunderBolt 3, which is USB C now.
  • Also the display can get brighter than the previous model
  • The top’d spec iMac with extra options would supposedly cost about the same price of the base spec’d iMac Pro.
  • Honestly I wouldn’t even recommend a top’d spec, because the iMac Pro is going to have considerable cooling upgrades, faster RAM, and way better GPU.
  • I’m not sure if the pin out or voltage is different on the brigher 5K panel from the previous P3 unit.

Early 2018 – iMac Pro – Xeon – 32GB DDR4 RAM 2666MHz

Not released yet…
New – $5440 to $18,000

  • Based God Model – 8 Core
  • Dark Souls Mid Boss Model – 10 Core
  • Mr Bones Wild Ride Model – 18 Core
  • Gone are traditional spinning rust HDDs, these will only have NVMe SSDs which will make these super quick.
  • Some spokesperson at Apple said the iMac Pro isn’t going to replace the Mac Pro, but honestly no one wants the trash can Mac Pro because it’s not as nice looking compared to an iMac. People will def shell out $1500 more on a base model iMac Pro, than the failed thermal designed Mac Pro.

 

And that’s it! I will be making a video soon to talk about iMacs and comparing them all. 🙂

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